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Texas Marriage Laws

Marriage law in the State of Texas requires the parties of the marriage to obtain a marriage license from a county clerk. Both the bride and groom are required to be present at the time of application. There is a 72 hour waiting period for the license and a $36 fee (minimum) payable in cash only to receive the license. Once the license has been issued it is valid for 30 days and can only be used within the State of Texas.

Minors under the age of 14 are not allowed to marry in Texas, however applicants age 16 to 18 must have parental consent or a court order in order to marry or receive a marriage license from the state. Applicants 14 to 16 must have a court order to marry.
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North Carolina Marriage Laws

Marriage law in North Carolina is overseen by Chapter 51 of the North Carolina General Statute. In order to marry in North Carolina, you must have a marriage license. Both the bride and groom are required to be present for the marriage license application; however one party may appear with a sworn and notarized affidavit on behalf of the other person. If the bride and/or groom are between the ages of 18 and 20, they must present a birth certificate. If between the ages of 16 and 17, they must present parental consent form that has been signed and notarized. If between the ages of 14 and 15, they must present a court order for marriage to continue. No one under the age of 14 will be issued a license to be married in North Carolina.
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New York Marriage Laws

To marry in the State of New York, you must first apply for a marriage license. Marriage licenses must be applied for at a town or city clerk and both parties of the marriage, the bride and groom, must be present when applying for the license. There is a 24 hour waiting period for the license to be issued and the license is valid for 60 days after issued. You are not required to be a resident of the State of New York in order to be married in the state, however you will not be able to obtain a license if the your marriage would be considered void in your home state. The fees for a license are between $35 and $50. No blood tests or medical examinations are required in order to obtain a marriage license.
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New Mexico Marriage Laws

In New Mexico, only the County Clerk’s office is allowed to issue a marriage license, which is required in order to be married in the state. The license will cost between $25 and $40 and is valid for one year after the date of issuance. There is no waiting period for a marriage license nor do you require a medical examination, however both parties of the marriage must be present when applying for the marriage license.
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New Jersey Marriage Laws

In order to marry in New Jersey, you must first apply for a marriage license. The marriage license must be applied for in the hometown of the bride, however, if the bride does not live in New Jersey then the license should be applied for in the hometown of the groom. In the event that neither the bride nor groom lives in the state of New Jersey, then the marriage license must be applied for in the town where they wish to marry. There is a 3 day waiting period for a marriage license and it is valid for 30 days from the date of issuance.
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New Hampshire Marriage Laws

To marry in New Hampshire, you must have a marriage license. You are not required to be a resident of the state in order to get a marriage license, however, if you do not live in New Hampshire, you must get the marriage license in the same place where you plan to be married. It is advisable to get your marriage license in the place where you live. Both the bride and groom must be present when applying for a marriage license and there is a three-day waiting period.
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Nevada Marriage Laws

The marriage laws in Nevada are not like most other states. Known for their ‘fast marriages’, Nevada is a hot spot for eloping and weddings for people from all over the world. To be married in Nevada, you do not need to be a resident, but you must have a valid marriage license issued in the State of Nevada. You will need to have photo identification and your original birth certificate. Both parties to the marriage must be present when applying for a license and there is no waiting period to be issued a license, however the license will expire in one year.

Marriages of minors age 16 or 17 must have one parent or legal guardian present or written and signed consent. For minors under the age of 16, only a court order can be requested by the parent or guardian and must be approved by the judge.
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Nebraska Marriage Laws

In order to marry in the State of Nebraska, you must have a valid marriage license, which can be applied for at any county or city office. Both parties to the marriage must be present when applying for a marriage license and there is no waiting period for the license to be issued. The issued marriage license is valid for one year anywhere in Nebraska.
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Montana Marriage Laws

In order to marry in the State of Montana, you must have a valid marriage license issued by any clerk of the district court in any county in Montana. Both parties of the proposed marriage must be in attendance to apply for a marriage license. There is no waiting period for a license to be issued if both applicants are over the age of 18.

The bride of the marriage is required to take a rubella blood test, unless she is over the age of 50. There are no blood test requirements for the groom. If either party is under the age of 18, but not less than 15, they must have consent of both parents unless only one parent has custody. Those who are age 16 and 17 will have to attend two counseling sessions together at least 10 days apart with a designated counselor. The counselor must provide a letter about their opinion of the marriage to be forwarded to a judge for judicial consent. No one under the age of 15 may marry in the State of Montana.
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Missouri Marriage Laws

In order to marry in the State of Missouri, you must first obtain a marriage license. Both the bride and groom to be are required to be in attendance when applying for a marriage license. There is a three-day waiting period for a license and the license will remain valid for 30 days after the date of issuance.

If one or both of the parties are under the age of 18, then they must provide parental or custodial consent before being married. Anyone under the age of 15 may not marry without the approval of a judge in the county where the license is applied for. The judge may only grant approval for good cause. People with mental handicaps may not marry without court approval.
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Mississippi Marriage Laws

Marriage in Mississippi is governed by Title 93 of the Mississippi code. It clearly outlines void marriages, which are incestuous marriages including first cousins. Incestuous marriages include any direct familial relations by whole or half blood or adoption. Mississippi also does not deem same sex marriages to be valid in the state. Mississippi does not recognize proxy, common law, same sex or cousin marriages.
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Minnesota Marriage Laws

Marriage in Minnesota is a civil contract between a man and a woman. In order to marry in Minnesota, you must obtain a marriage license and have the marriage solemnized by an authorized person and in front of two witnesses. There is a $70 fee for the license and a 5-day waiting period—the license is valid for 6 months after the date of issuance. Only one of the parties to be married need to apply for the license in person and you need not be a resident of the State of Minnestoa to obtain a marriage license.
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Michigan Marriage Laws

A valid marriage in Michigan constitutes a man and woman who are capable of giving consent and consent is obtained freely, have a marriage license and the marriage must be solemnized by an authorized person in the State of Michigan.

A judge of the district court, a district court magistrate, a municipal judge, a judge of probate, a federal court judge, the mayor of a city, the county clerk of a county with more than 2 million residents, a minister of the gospel and non-resident ministers of the gospel who is valid to procure a marriage elsewhere in Michigan state, may all solemnize a marriage in the State of Michigan. You must have two witnesses, not including the officiate, at your wedding. There is a special law that allows the “people called friends or Quakers” and “people of any other particular denomination having, as such, any peculiar mode of solemnizing marriages” to solemnize their marriages in their own manner. The officiate of the marriage must return a ‘duplicate marked’ copy of the license to the married couple and submit the original to the clerk that issued it within 10 days of the marriage ceremony.
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Massachusetts Marriage Laws

Those who wish to marry in the State of Massachusetts must have a valid marriage license issued in Massachusetts. Both parties of the marriage must apply for a marriage license together. The license is issued three days after application and is valid for 6 months. The minimum fee for a marriage license is $4 as defined by State law; however the rate may vary from office to office.
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Maryland Marriage Laws

In order to marry in Maryland, you must first get a marriage license from the Circuit Court Clerk’s office in the county where the marriage is to take place. In most counties, both the bride and groom must be present to apply for a license, but all marriages must take place in the county where the license was issued and there is a standard two-day waiting period before the license is issued. The license is valid for 6 months from the date of issuance.

It is illegal for marriages to occur between family lineages within 3 degrees of direct family relations. You must be 18-years-old or older to marry legally. If those to be wed are 16 or 17 years-old, they must have parental consent or a signed certificate from a physician stating the woman is pregnant and the date or expected date of delivery. A 15-year-old female may be married if she has parental consent or has a signed physician’s certificate stating she is pregnant and the expected or actual date of delivery. Residents 14-years of age and younger may not marry.
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Maine Marriage Laws

In order to get married in Maine, you must obtain a marriage license from a town or county office. There is no longer waiting periods to obtain a license or to have the ceremony performed. Both parties of the marriage must be present in order to obtain a marriage license. The license is valid for 90 days and can only be used in Maine.
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Louisiana Marriage Laws

Marriage in the State of Louisiana is governed by the Louisiana Revised Statute 9, Code Title IV – Husband and Wife. Marriages in Louisiana are valid between a man and a woman. Cousin marriages are allowed, however same-sex marriages are not valid.

Louisiana also does not recognize common law marriages. Louisiana has also passed covenant marriages.
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Kentucky Marriage Laws

Kentucky marriage law is regulated by the Kentucky Revised Code, title 35. Marriage in Kentucky is only valid if between two people of the opposite sex. Same-sex marriages and incestuous marriages are not recognized by the state and are considered void. Your marriage will also be void if one or more of the parties is judged as mentally disabled, still married to another living person where a divorce has not been decreed, or when not sanctified by an authorized officiate.

Both parties must be over the age of 18 years old. If the parties are over the age of 16, but not yet 18, then parental consent must be obtained. You must also apply for a marriage license through your county office, both the bride and groom-to-be must be present when applying for the license, however, the request may be made in writing by the female. A fee of $34.50 is required to obtain the license. A marriage license is only valid for 30 days and can only be used in the State of Kentucky. 
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Kansas Marriage Laws

Marriage in Kansas is governed by Chapter 23 “Domestic Relations” in the Kansas statute. The definition of a Kansas marriage contract is between two parties of the opposite sex and is a civil contract—marriages of other kinds are considered to be void as they are in opposition of this policy. All incestuous marriages are also declared to be void. Kansas does not allow same-sex or common-law marriages.

A Kansas marriage is formalized between two consenting people after a license has been issued by the State. Both parties in the marriage must make a declaration to be joined in front of an authorized officiating person and two witnesses, who must be over the age of 18. The officiating person does not count as a witness. An officiating person may be: an ordained clergyman or religious authority, a licensed officiator or appointee of a bishop serving as the regular clergyman of a church, a judge or justice of a court of record, a municipal judge of a city in Kansas and retired judges or justices of a court of record.
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Iowa Marriage Laws

In order to get married in the State of Iowa, you must have a marriage license. Marriage licenses can be obtained from the county clerk or county recorder’s office. In Iowa, both parties must be present to obtain a marriage license as well as one witness. If one or both of the parties are under the age of 18, then parental consent is required in order for a license to be issued. You should apply for your marriage license at least one month in advance, however Iowa marriage licenses expire after 6 months. You will not be issued an Iowa marriage license until after three business days have passed. Price varies from county to county. Both parties to the marriage must consent to the marriage.
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